Publications

Books

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Peer-reviewed

  • Dražanová, Lenka and Andrew Roberts. 2020. Are nationalists better citizens? Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies The European Governance and Politics Programme (EGPP) 2020/90.

The recent rise in the popularity of nationalist movements tells us that more attention should be paid to the effects of national feeling on politics. This article considers the potential relationship between national identity and active and allegiant citizenship and particularly whether nationalists and patriots are better citizens than those who have weaker feelings towards their country. We analyze these relationships using data from the European Values Study in 2008 and 2017. Our main models control for a variety of political, social, and economic causes of good citizenship and include country fixed effects in addition to three measures of national feeling. Our findings indicate that civic national identity is connected with better citizenship on virtually all of our outcomes, whereas ethnic national identity is frequently connected with worse citizenship. We explain these results using social identity theory and theories of prejudice. The results suggest that politicians ignore or downplay national feeling at their peril.

Attitudes toward immigration have attracted much scholarly interest and fuelled extensive empirical research in recent years. Many different hypotheses have been proposed to explain individual and contextual differences in attitudes towards immigration. However, it has become difficult to align all of the evidence that the literature has produced so far. The present article contributes to the systematization of political science empirical research on public attitudes toward immigration in the last decade. Using a simplified combined-tests technique, this paper identifies the micro- as well as macro-level factors that are consistently linked to attitudes toward immigration. It reports findings from a meta-analysis of the determinants of general attitudes toward immigration in published articles in thirty highly ranked peer-reviewed political science journals for the years 2009 – 2019. The results warrant a summary of factors affecting attitudes to immigration in a systematic, measurable and rigorous manner.

Dramatic changes in the ethnic composition of countries in the last decades have sparked new interest among social scientists in studying and uncovering the role of ethnic diversity on social, political and economic outcomes. Yet, most ethnic fractionalization indices used by scholars to study these effects treat ethnic heterogeneity as time-invariant, thus concealing its long-term effects. However, failing to take into account historical developments in ethnic composition might seriously hinder our understanding of their effects on social, economic, and political outcomes. This paper introduces a new dataset containing an annual ethnic fractionalization index for 162 countries across all continents in the period of 1945–2013. The Historical Index of Ethnic Fractionalization (HIEF) dataset is a natural extension of previous ethnic fractionalization indices. It offers the opportunity to study the effects of ethnic fractionalization across countries and over time. The article concludes by offering some preliminary descriptive analysis of patterns of change in ethnic fractionalization over time.

This study investigates how the tenor of the political climate during a person’s youth affects his or her attitudes towards immigration in adulthood. We analyze why cohorts formulate distinct patterns in attitudes towards immigration through a collective process of political socialization during the formative years. The theoretical arguments are tested using hierarchical age-period-cohort modelling across twelve cohorts in nine European countries using micro attitudinal data (2002-2016) integrated with historical macro-political data. We find that contextual exposure to principles of equality and tradition in the formative political climate is central to the formulation of a person’s attitudes towards immigration later in life. While the prevalence of the principle of equality affects immigration attitudes in adulthood positively, the principle of tradition does so negatively. The findings imply that even subtle and cyclical shifts in national politics affect the political orientations of those undergoing the process of political socialization.

Using an analysis of variations in aggregate levels of tolerance as well as in the educational effect as a practical example, this case study shows how to apply multilevel modelling techniques using multilevel logistic and multilevel ordinal regression models. At the micro-level, data reported in the analysis are derived from the World Values Survey third wave (1995–1998) across 24 countries. At the macro-level, data are derived from the Polity IV project’s dataset regarding countries’ political regimes. The case study reviews the basic concepts, terminology, and applications of multilevel modelling.

This article focuses on national identity in the post-communist Czech Republic. It empirically analyses attitudes of national pride and ethnic exclusionism and their interrelations in the years 1995 and 2003. Comparative studies dealing with national identity usually refer to the Czech Republic as an exceptional case. By focusing on the Czech case, this study contributes to a better understanding of local variations of concepts such as national pride and ethnic exclusionism. Confirmatory factor analysis is used to establish the multidimensionality of national pride and ethnic exclusionism in the Czech Republic at two time-points. The interrelationships between different dimensions of national pride and of ethnic exclusionism are analysed using structural equation modelling. Data are drawn from the International Social Survey Programme National Identity Modules 1995 and 2003. Following empirical results, the paper suggests more valid dimensions for the concepts of national pride and ethnic exclusionism in the distinctive Czech context and discusses their mutual relationships.

Using an article focused on national identity in the post-communist Czech Republic as a practical example, this case study shows how to empirically assess a research problem with the help of confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling. This article analyses attitudes of national pride and ethnic exclusionism and their interrelations in the Czech Republic for the year 2003. Data are drawn from the International Social Survey Programme National Identity Module 2003. First, confirmatory factor analysis is used to establish the multidimensionality of national pride and of ethnic exclusionism. Second, the interrelationships between different dimensions of national pride and of ethnic exclusionism are analysed using structural equation modelling. The case study reviews the basic concepts, terminology and applications of structural equation modelling.

Research and Policy Reports and Other Publications

Media coverage:

The State of Play of Schengen Governance (EU Chronicle)

Media coverage:

Stakes Are High for Democracy With Colleges Under Siege (Inside Higher Ed)

It Takes More Than An Election To Guard Against Authoritarianism (Forbes)

Taming authoritarian attitudes (Democracy Digest)

Liberal Arts Education Counteracts Authoritarianism in Universities and Politics, GU Report Says (The Hoya)

Forse con la cultura non si mangia, ma ci si difende dall’autoritarismo (The Vision) in Italian

Media coverage:

Eurobarometer: Wie Europas Bürger über Migration und Integration denken (Bildungs Spiegel)

Government report coverage:

10 years Expert Council for Integration of Austria – 10 years Integration Report

Media coverage:

Has Europe turned its back on the duty to care? (Vox Europe)

Data

  • Dražanová, Lenka, 2019, “Historical Index of Ethnic Fractionalization Dataset (HIEF)”, https://doi.org/10.7910/DVN/4JQRCL, Harvard Dataverse, V2, UNF:6:z4J/b/PKbUpNdIoeEFPvaw== [fileUNF]

Media coverage:

Diversity and prosocial behavior (Science)

Academic blog posts and op-eds